Tag Archives: SciFi

Psychological portrait

It’s time to post some art done in “old school” medium; The Graphite pencil.

Between 1997 – 1999 in my teens, I spent a considerable amount of time doing small psychological portraits.
I had a perfectionist obsession with an 0.3 mm mechanical pencil with HB softness leads.

That was before I learned the digital medium. Even before I learned to illustrate with an airbrush.

I did some pretty amazing stuff with my trusty old 0.3 mm back then 😉 It was the tool of my choice!

Usually i took a sheet of A4 photocopy paper, with a fine grain (to give the HB leads a little something to bite in to).

With such a fine tip, I developed a technique to lighten the strokes to a minimum. I lifted the paper off the table to apply the lightest pencil strokes possible. I did not use an eraser or smudge the paper with anything. I wanted it to be clean. To me, Cleanliness was next to Godliness!

As I was zoning out and shading an area, pass by pass darkening it, impurities such as a dust speckle, or the grain of the paper caused slightly darker details. I took these “errors” as sort of hints, and started to plot what they represented to me. I started to see shapes of immense detail… I managed to tap in to my creative subconsciousness. I started to refine those details and instinctively rotated the pen between my fingers to find the sharpest edge of the 0.3 mm tip. That way I could reach dents in the paper grain, and make areas darker, where need to be.

As I continued finishing the piece, the complex shapes started to connect, creating dynamics and content.
It seemed that the grain of the paper continued the shapes to an immense level of detail. Some people (with sharp eyesight) have experienced that mesmerizing effect.

I did this piece yesterday, with the very same exact 0.3 mm mechanical pencil 🙂 I’m happy I still have the precision, patience and light touch to create with this challenging style! Spending some 15 hours with an area of 115 mm x 125 mm may sound crazy to some, but hey, Art is! I’ts quite beautiful original IRL (In Real Life).

One might say that the face is realistic, and the “hair” is abstract, even tough I see it the other way around. I see the face as simplified to very few contours of flowing shape, and the shading in the face is a subtle hint to it’s form. To me, the hair is the “tangible” part 😀 It took most of my time creating it.

This kind of a piece has some timeless feeling to it. A hybrid of some Art Nouveau, Classical, Cartoon and Graffiti style… Somehow, I see it alive and breathing. The present, without abandoning the past…

Maybe someone would like to plot the hidden message in the graffiti style lettering from the abstraction?

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I’m in Art Takes London.

Check out my (small, but dense) portfolio:
http://www.arttakeslondon.com/albertlaine

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I’ll be at Berlin during June 2nd to 5th with our installation FocusPocus-videoparadox, so feel free to grab my sleeve and share thoughts!
EMERGEANDSEE Festival 2011

Peace.


New artwork

CloudZ.

Seek, and thou shall find...

Clicking the image brings a bit larger view of the piece.

Doing this, I ended up thinking about stereotypes, responsibility and social pressure, but it has elements and room for interpretation.
It took some 10 intense painting sessions to get it where it is.

It’s available in (insanely high resolution) physical format as well.

If you like it, feel free to share the link etc. I like to hear what people think, feel & see in this stuff.

I have projects where I’m using this piece, so stay tuned!


Digital Art painted with an iPhone

This was my first painting I did using a nice little app, iDoodle Lite. I spent a good couple of hours in to it.

Back then (spring 2010), there was an option to send it to Idoodles online Gallery, witch I did.

I named it “The Portable Knot”.

What do you see in it?

The developer of the app contacted me via email, and asked “how did you achieve that effect?”.

I explained my traditional technique;

-From dark to light, loose to tight, some elbow grease and intuition… That’s about it!

He also gave me the full version of the app. Thanks!

I made a new pic with it. I’ll upload the pic, and a video of the creative process later.

Just like openCanvas on PC,  iDoodle saves a “stroke-by-stroke animation” how the image was born.

Very cool. A fantastic way to document the creative process!

If you like it, please share & tweet etc!


A NewClear World

This is a sculpture born entirely without a scetch or a plan. I was totally in awe, as the lumps in the side of the head turned out as WWII pilot glasses! It took a while before the “red” button appeared, and eventually the whole thing made sense to me.

Due to the small scale, many call them statuettes. Made with the same technique as the piece in this post.

A photograph does not show everything from a statue, so I used a mirror to show the other side.

Imagine it as a 10 feet bronze monument, where would you place it?

Click the image for a larger view.


Painting with oils:

Generally there are two techniques to paint with oils.

1)Alla prima

2)Painting by layers.

In alla prima, one paints a finished artwork straight away with confident brush strokes. The strokes must be done precisely, with just the right colour. The finished piece may look completely abstract on closer observation, but (if desired) photographic, when viewed from further away.

When one is painting by layers, layers of paint thinned to translucency are applied one on top of another. More oil medium is added to the paint mixture by each subsequent layer. So, in the beginning one uses ”drier” paint, and in the end more oily paint. Thus the lower layers absorb some of the oil, but the higher layers are always more oily and elastic, and will dry (and shrink) the last. The surface of the paint will dry later than the layers beneath it, and thus will not crack.

First paint layer (of course) the canvas is applied with is gesso, the base paint. First ”real” layer of paint is called imprimatura, witch is neutral by it’s value. A common imprimatura is burnt umber mixed with white, thinned to milky consistency. Imprimatura (aka staining the canvas) is a very substantial phase, as white paint will then lighten and dark paint darken the painting.

As the imprimatura has dried, the next layer is painted. It’s called a grisaille. Grisaille (traditionally) is also made monochromatically (with one colour). It’s sole purpose is to set the darks and lights of the painting. Think of it as a black and white photograph (or sepia, for that matter).

Painting from a model (or especially from a photograph) is not inherently difficult, as the content of the picture is known, and the guide to mix the paints is straight in front of your eyes. You can even compare the paint straight from the tip of your palette knife! Getting the proportions right is even easier: Use a projector to project the image to the canvas!

If one desires to create new imaginery systematically, without a model, a first solid step is to make a sketch (or a “cartone” in fresco). The sketch is then transferred (with one mean or another) to the canvas.

It is challenging to start making a piece systematically, without any prior knowledge of the end result! To find a new image with a coherent technique, is a journey where a great confidence to ones intuition is a necessity. One must trust, that the piece will make sense in the end. To me, it is the only way to ”find” new images. I use the term find, as it describes the creative process (IMHO) well.

I made the grisaille of this painting on top of a neutral imprimatura only with burnt umber and white.

First the pyramids appeared, and then the general mood and the dynamics of the directions. I found the basic idea and composition of this painting in a couple of hours (this time). Then I started working on the illusion of depth and distance with white. Then I started to see skulls in the painting. Apparently I was getting too tired, so I headed to bed.

In the morning I saw very interesting subjects in the painting. The distances were not far enough, so I had to continue with white layers. To substantiate the pyramids to the background.

After some hours of work, the painting was starting to take shape. The only problem was that the painting started to look like SciFi / Fantasy -genre. So it’s a time off again, until I see more interesting, hopefully abstract elements in the painting.

The idea of the work is of the highest importance. So I’ll stay in the grisaille phase (at least) one more session, until I feel that I can move to the next step. Then I’ll find the main colors of the elements. These colours aren’t applied straight away, but their complementary colours are applied to the shadows, one layer at a time. Finally the colour scheme sets it’s place, and the last strokes are made to the highlights.

6-12 months after the last stroke the painting is coated with vernissa.

I’ll post more of the progress later. Now I started to learn to play the 10 hole blues harp!

Oh yeah, and sorry about my English. Grammar cops can post to comments! 😉


What Came Out Of My Subconscious

I found a nice method to paint, that (rather than adding dark lines of values to white background) works by making the background medium dark or black, and adding light to “illuminate” the scene.

Sometimes it was kinda scary seeing, what comes from the darkness.

Think About It

Think About It

Larger version here.

This is a part of my “Surreal Superheroes” series, where I tap in to my subconscious mind, and let it make the picture preconscious.

A video, of the process: